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  • Students in ENGL 3063: Environmental Justice Literatures, an interdisciplinary course, connect their reading to the real world through a bicycle “toxic tour”and urban farm service activity in Minneapolis with the organization Tamales y Bicicletas.
  • English majors Bailey Kemp and Sarah Severson interview visiting award-winning author David Ebershoff at a public event as part of a research collaboration with Prof. Michael Lackey.
  • Group of students with Danez Smith
  • UMN Morris costumes from The Tempest
  • Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Liberal Arts Heid Erdrich talks with the campus community about Native American poetry.
  • Anishinaabe singer-songwriter Annie Humphrey talks with English students during her campus visit.
  • Creative writing students gift poems to an American basswood on campus with visiting Vancouver poet Ariel Gordon.
  • English
  • English
  • Professor Janet Schrunk Ericksen

Students in ENGL 3063: Environmental Justice Literatures, an interdisciplinary course, connect their reading to the real world through a bicycle “toxic tour” and urban farm service activity in Minneapolis with the organization Tamales y Bicicletas. T&B empowers local Latinx and immigrant communities through environmental and food justice advocacy.

English majors Bailey Kemp and Sarah Severson interview visiting award-winning author David Ebershoff at a public event as part of a research collaboration with Prof. Michael Lackey.

Award-winning poet Danez Smith (far left) poses with students and professors during their campus visit as part of ENGL 3015: Writing Poetry for the 21st Century.

ENGL 1509: Literary Studies students perform a scene from Shakespeare’s The Tempest in full costume.

Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Liberal Arts Heid Erdrich talks with the campus community about Native American poetry. 

Anishinaabe singer-songwriter Annie Humphrey talks with English students during her campus visit.

Creative writing students gift poems to an American basswood on campus with visiting Vancouver poet Ariel Gordon.

Visiting writers talk with the UMN Morris community at the annual Prairie Gate Literary Festival.

English faculty member and poet Athena Kildegaard speaks at the EcoStation Dedication (2015).

English Professor and Academic Dean Janet Schrunk Ericksen works with literature students.


“A story matrix connects all of us...And the story begins exactly where it is supposed to begin. We cannot skip any part.” —Joy Harjo, from Crazy Brave: A Memoir

The English Discipline at Morris is made up of faculty who are dedicated and accomplished scholars, creative writers, and teachers. Our diverse course offerings introduce students to a wide range of literatures written in English, while also offering opportunities for focused study. The English major and minor provide students with a foundation for success in any career. We also offer a creative writing minor. Our faculty help students achieve intellectual independence; clear, confident expression; broad perspectives; and a value for a diversity of histories, cultures, and forms of expression—the types of skills students need to tackle the complex problems and opportunities of the 21st century.

Morris Advantages

English literature and creative writing classes are small at UMN Morris. Small classes facilitate dialog across difference; camaraderie, collaboration, and friendship among students; unexpected discoveries and an in-depth grasp of subject matter; and close mentoring relationships between students and professors.

English students choose from a variety of electives, and these electives make up more than half of the credits toward their major. Students often work with faculty to shape programs of study that focus on specific topics that interest them. Through elective coursework, students can emphasize and develop expertise in:

  • African American literature
  • Creative writing
  • Environmental literature
  • Feminist and queer literature
  • Genre fiction
  • Medieval literature
  • Multiethnic literatures
  • Native American and Indigenous literatures
  • Shakespeare
  • Writing/editing  

The English Discipline strongly encourages study abroad. A spring term or semester abroad can usually be quite easily integrated into the curriculum.

UMN Morris English students and faculty are among the most active on campus. There are ample opportunities for students. Students can:

  • Edit or contribute to campus publications
  • Give a public reading
  • Join Floating World, the campus creative writing club
  • Participate in a community-outreach program
  • Serve as a research assistant to a faculty member
  • Volunteer at the Prairie Gate Literary Festival

Successful Outcomes

UMN Morris English students are highly successful! Learn more about career and graduate school opportunities.

English News